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Thread: Basline for 2016 widetrack

  1. #1
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    Basline for 2016 widetrack

    Just getting into Sprint racing on a 2016 widetrack laydown type seat maxis tires 40mm stiff axle. I would like a starting point for weight presentages and a starting point for airpressure. Is the camber pills a got adjisusment? Any additional information will be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by Jax14; 07-06-2018 at 04:42 PM. Reason: Added info about axle

  2. #2
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    I definitely need some help freeing this thing up. What air pressure range can you run? 13lbs did not seem to be enough as I had a hop until it broke free in the tight left hand turns or a bad push from just before Apex through the exit. I widened both front and rear it seemed to help the feel but did not show much in lap times.

  3. #3
    4 Cycle Advanced User alvin l nunley's Avatar
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    This may sound stupid but; the front end is connected to the back end. Things you do to the front, effect the back, things you do to the back, effect the front. The quickest way to stop a push is to narrow the front, or widen the back, but don't widen or narrow both. Another way is to put more weight percentage on the front. A push in left-hand corners, or right-hand corners, suggests, in some cases, a bent frame. Get the kart on a set of scales and find out what the corner weights are. Bathroom scales will work just fine as long as there on a flat surface. Also front to rear. Get the front corners to weigh the same, the back wheel weights as close to the same as you can get them, and start with a 45% front 55% rear. Work from there. What kind of bracing do you have on the seat? How wide is the front and rear tread width. Center to center of the tires.

  4. #4
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    The track I plan on running has two tough left handlers it pushes in one and hops in the other. I found a coyote website that gave me some presentages I put it on scales front and left % was very close but the cross % was off. I think the rear axle was not flat and I moved one washer from under spindle to the top and that got both front tire weights within 5lb and both rear tires within 10lbs of each other. Now back to the track for some real testing against the stopwatch

  5. #5
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    The first thing you should do is get the rear axle square in the frame. Put a ruler on the bottom of the frame and measure from the bottom of the axle to the top of the ruler to make it the same left and right. Next center your steering best you can so the stub axles are parallel and measure the wheel base. Left and right should be within 1/8" of each other.

    Next get the kart on a stand with the engine and seat off then get down behind it with your eye on the center line and sight the top of the axle with the heads of the king pins. This will tell you if the frame is twisted. If everything looks ok you can start working on the front end geometry.

    Set your spindle washers the same top and bottom and the same on both sides. Set your caster to the zero setting and put in the neutral camber pills. Next center the steering arm by eye (it's not centered in the frame so you can't measure it) and set your steering lock if you have one. Now set your toe straight ahead by adjusting the tie rods.

    Adjust your rear track to the widest allowed usually 55" or at least the widest possible if you can't get 55". Adjust your front track so you have two 1/4" spacers on the outside of each wheel. Set your tire pressure to 12 psi.

    The seat height and front to back adjustment is determined by your body size shape and weight but if you're big try to get the seat as far forward and down as you can.

    The hopping and pushing is likely your driving style. If you go in too fast and shallow you will use all your lateral G force in one short moment. This will cause your tires to overload and hop then after your chassis will relax and stop working causing a push.
    Slow down allot more than you think you should before you get to the turn then drive through the turn using as much track as you can for the fastest exit speed.

    Hope that helps,
    Sundog

  6. #6
    4 Cycle Advanced User
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    First of all I do not have a coyote. With that said, I firmly believe you are running an axle that is too stiff/hard for your situation. If you can get a 40 mm soft axle I think you will immediately notice a difference. From there you can fine tune with caster and track width on the front and rear. Without the soft axle, wide in the rear as suggested would be your best bet. If you call coyote they can help. Ryan Cassity does a lot of testing for coyote so they have a lot of feedback.

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